Monthly Archives: December 2014

Addiction to Survey Research

Updated May 21, 2020 There’s an addiction to survey research.  By this I mean that those who ask questions (survey researchers), as well as those who rely on and promote survey research (almost everyone else), acknowledge and demonstrate the numerous … Continue reading

Posted in Survey Research | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

Survey Research: Correlation Rather Than Causality

Survey research focuses on correlation, rather than causality and, as James A. Davis pointed out a long time ago, “any [statistically] significant correlation . . . is generally publishable” [“Great Books and Small Groups: An Informal History of a National … Continue reading

Posted in Survey Research | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Interview: Control, Power, Popularity

In my book, The Problem with Survey Research, (p. 219) I discuss the interview in terms of control: Interviewers do all they can to “maintain control” of all aspects of interviews s[Grovel, The Art of the Interview, pp. 133-36]; they “exert … Continue reading

Posted in Survey Research | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Surveys of “Trust in Goverment” Unreliable

All surveys produce unreliable information (my main point in The Problem with Survey Research)–including surveys that ask about trust in government.  Here’s a supporting comment by Michael Lipsky that appears in the November/December 2014 issue of Public Administration Review, p. … Continue reading

Posted in Survey Research | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment