Monthly Archives: December 2014

Addiction to Survey Research

There’s an addiction to survey research.  By this I mean that those who ask questions (survey researchers), as well as those who rely on and promote survey research (almost everyone else), acknowledge and demonstrate the numerous and severe weaknesses of … Continue reading

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Survey Research: Correlation Rather Than Causality

Survey research focuses on correlation, rather than causality and, as James A. Davis pointed out a long time ago, “any [statistically] significant correlation . . . is generally publishable” [“Great Books and Small Groups: An Informal History of a National … Continue reading

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The Interview: Control, Power, Popularity

In my book, The Problem with Survey Research, (p. 219) I discuss the interview in terms of control: Interviewers do all they can to “maintain control” of all aspects of interviews s[Grovel, The Art of the Interview, pp. 133-36]; they “exert … Continue reading

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Surveys of “Trust in Goverment” Unreliable

All surveys produce unreliable information (my main point in The Problem with Survey Research)–including surveys that ask about trust in government,.  Here’s a supporting comment by Michael Lipsky that appears in the November/December 2014 issue of Public Administration Review , … Continue reading

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