Author Archives: georgebeam

About georgebeam

George Beam is an educator and author. The perspectives that inform his interpretations of the topics of this blog–-as well as his other writings and university courses -–are system analysis, behaviorism, and Internet effects. Specific interests include quality management, methodology, and politics. He is Associate Professor Emeritus, Department of Public Administration; Affiliated Faculty, Department of Political Science; and, previously, Head, Department of Public Administration, University of Illinois at Chicago

My Open Internet Problem-Solving Networks Similar to Facebook Groups/”communities”

I am working on a manuscript, Problem-Solving via the Internet: An Alternative to Nation-States, Governments, and Politics in which open Internet problem-solving networks (e.g., Wikipedia, Peer-to-Patent) are presented as the most efficient and effective institutions to solve problems, now that … Continue reading

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Effects of World Wide Web

“passing laws changes little, or takes a generation or longer to have effect.  Deep changes to people’s lives can be made almost instantly, however, by the introduction a new technology that everyone wants. . . . [T]he world wide web … Continue reading

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Question Wording, Change in Wording, and Rosa’s Law

Question wording affects answers.   The first sentence in the comment below (No. 85 Rosa’s Law and Surveys) is an acknowledgement of this fundamental flaw in survey research:  “Question wording plays a critical role in [affecting] how respondents . . … Continue reading

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Fear of Death Drives Belief in Religion

Fear of death drives belief in religion.  This is a main point in Tom Stoppard’s new play, “The Hard Problem”, which I’ve reviewed on Amazon.  Here’s the review, with a link to a related study, as well as comments about … Continue reading

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Does Having Sex Boost Work Performance?

According to survey researchers in The Journal of Management, married people who have sexual intercourse at night have increase work performance at their offices the next day.  This may or may not be true because the research is based on self-reports … Continue reading

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Internet Effects: Declining Significance of Nation-State and Government

The 21st century—certainly since 2007 with the emergence of the smartphone and cloud computing—is the Internet Age; a time in which the Internet, with attendant hardware (e.g., computers, smartphones, and sensors) and software (e.g., the cloud, Google, and  apps), dominates … Continue reading

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Internet Effects: They Have, Right Now, Another You

The Internet and attendant hardware and software allows companies/platforms to collect data on Internet users and via algorithms reconstruct who we, in many respects, are. Moreover, we’re not able to access, modify, and/or delete our reconstructed selves. “Facebook”, Sue Halpern … Continue reading

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